Monday, April 13, 2015

K: Kilimanjaro, Katahdin, K2

To all the great people who have been visiting and leaving comments for me: my apologies for not responding. I've been out rambling the deserts, hiking, camping, and getting more photos (can't promise they are good, but the subject matter was amazing). I'm back now and I will be stopping by to say hi and continue meeting great new bloggers!

 
I couldn't make up my mind this time, and didn't have any great "K" photos that I could think of, so I thought I'd give a shout-out to several mountains, and some books that are related to them. These aren't reviews, because I haven't necessarily read the books.

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K2 (28,251'): The second highest mountain in the world, and one of the most dangerous. Of the 302 people who have summitted, 80 died. Unlike Everest, which is deadly enough, this is not a mountain you can pay to have a guide lead you up.
Savage Summit: The True Stories of the First Five Women Who Climbed K2, the World's Most Feared Mountain, by Jennifer Jordan, 2005. The subtitle pretty much says it all. K2 is considered the world's most formidable mountain (even if it is 2nd highest), and only 6 women have climbed it. Three died on the way back down. This is the story of those 6 women.

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Kilimanjaro (19,341'): Located in Tanzania, it's the highest mountain in Africa, and is especially stirking because it sits out there alone. Kili is a stratovolcano--just like Fuji and all those lovely mountains in the Washington Cascades.
Okay, the book for this one's a no-brainer. It's really only a short story, but it's the first thing that comes to mind when I think of the mountain and books. The Snows of Kilimanjaro, by Ernest Hemingway. You all read it back in middle school or high school, right?




9791Katahdin (5270'):  Mt. Katahdin in Maine is the northern terminus of the Appalachian Trail. That trail begins down in Georgia, so it's a bit of a triumph to get there. For a funny, if at times appalling (to those of us who have done a fair bit of backpacking) account of hiking a bit of the trail, my choice for this mountain is A Walk in the Woods: Rediscovering America on the Appalachian Trail, by Bill Bryson, 1992. If you want to hike the trail, there are many far better books. But (as you can see, I've read this one) if you want to laugh at a couple of guys in way over their heads, this is the book.

9 comments:

  1. Seen a lot of photos of that and I think I know someone who climbed it

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    1. No one I know has climbed it, I don't think.

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  2. Strangely, the only Hemmingway I've read has been as an adult.

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    1. Maybe it's a generational thing. I don't think my boys have read any in high school.

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  3. Stopping during the #Challenge to say hi and see what my fellow writers are up to. Thanks for all the hard work it takes to participate and bringing fine information to me. If you have a minute, come and see me. I'll be watching for you.

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    1. Working hard to catch up on visits after being out of town for a week! Thanks for coming by.

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  4. Hi - you can't go wrong with Bryson!
    Awesome photos throughout your blog - thanks for sharing!

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    1. I do enjoy his work. Though I recall reading one book that was about the US, and he was talking about my home area, and I didn't think he had his facts very straight, or if not facts, then impressions. Made me wonder about things he has written about other places!

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  5. That's a good way of cheating on your theme! And it's not cheating - it's just bending the self-imposed rules :D

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